"How amazing to have found this way of living! I don’t want to sound like a turkey, like I think I know everything, but these last few years, this food journey of ‘self sufficiency’ or what ever you like to call it, it’s taught me so much. It’s opened my eyes, and my mind. I look at what is considered normal, and I’m concerned. What I’d been doing for years, which is relying on the supermarket system for my food is clearly unnatural and I’ll be brave enough to say, totally and utterly wrong and in no way good for us or our natural world. We are bedazzled with choice for food in the supermarket isles, choice for the same meal just slightly tweaked, sugar reduced, no fat, salt reduced, all unnecessary.
Whats on offer is highly processed food, pre-cooked food, chemically treated food, its convenient and it shoved in our face as the only option. But what I’ve learnt, albeit slowly over some years is that the answer lies in the past. The answer lies with cultures that have remained unchanged in regards to food acquisition for hundreds of years, and they’re doing just fine. I’ve learnt that the alternatives to the supermarket option are totally doable. I’ve learnt the value of a days work, of working to achieve something that will give direct benefit to your family. Planting veg gives me food that I once sat in an office to earn money to then buy food with. Now I just grow the food. Somehow I cut out most of that reliance on the supermarket. Now I realise that the supermarket can return to a general store, and we’d all still survive quiet dandy. The staples are all we rely on now. Someone else still makes our flour, salt, sugar, spices, dairy etc. The rest we seem to be in control of now. And by being constantly open to new/old ideas around food, like the root veg sand experiment, I reckon we’re doing ok. And it’s not like we never get to eat a burger, sushi or thai noodle soup. I’m not that hard ass to give up those joys. But for our everyday family eating, we’re outside the system now. No plans to return.”
Rohan Anderson, Whole Larder Love
I’ve got so much admiration for him, his way of life, the hard work he willingly chooses. What an inspiration. If you don’t already, I highly recommend keeping up with his blog, Whole Larder Love. He may teach you a thing or two.

"How amazing to have found this way of living! I don’t want to sound like a turkey, like I think I know everything, but these last few years, this food journey of ‘self sufficiency’ or what ever you like to call it, it’s taught me so much. It’s opened my eyes, and my mind. I look at what is considered normal, and I’m concerned. What I’d been doing for years, which is relying on the supermarket system for my food is clearly unnatural and I’ll be brave enough to say, totally and utterly wrong and in no way good for us or our natural world. We are bedazzled with choice for food in the supermarket isles, choice for the same meal just slightly tweaked, sugar reduced, no fat, salt reduced, all unnecessary.

Whats on offer is highly processed food, pre-cooked food, chemically treated food, its convenient and it shoved in our face as the only option. But what I’ve learnt, albeit slowly over some years is that the answer lies in the past. The answer lies with cultures that have remained unchanged in regards to food acquisition for hundreds of years, and they’re doing just fine. I’ve learnt that the alternatives to the supermarket option are totally doable. I’ve learnt the value of a days work, of working to achieve something that will give direct benefit to your family. Planting veg gives me food that I once sat in an office to earn money to then buy food with. Now I just grow the food. Somehow I cut out most of that reliance on the supermarket. Now I realise that the supermarket can return to a general store, and we’d all still survive quiet dandy. The staples are all we rely on now. Someone else still makes our flour, salt, sugar, spices, dairy etc. The rest we seem to be in control of now. And by being constantly open to new/old ideas around food, like the root veg sand experiment, I reckon we’re doing ok. And it’s not like we never get to eat a burger, sushi or thai noodle soup. I’m not that hard ass to give up those joys. But for our everyday family eating, we’re outside the system now. No plans to return.”

Rohan Anderson, Whole Larder Love

I’ve got so much admiration for him, his way of life, the hard work he willingly chooses. What an inspiration. If you don’t already, I highly recommend keeping up with his blog, Whole Larder Love. He may teach you a thing or two.